An Equally Practical + Aspirational Family Home

An Equally Practical + Aspirational Family Home

An Equally Practical + Aspirational Family Home

Architecture

by Amelia Barnes

Jacoby by Lucy Clemenger Architects is a transformed Federation home. Photo – Derek Swalwell. Styling – Studio Stamp

A new plunge pool sits just outside the open-plan domain. Photo – Derek Swalwell. Styling – Studio Stamp

Artwork on right by Milo Lockett. Photo – Derek Swalwell. Styling – Studio Stamp

An AGA was taken from a previous home to reuse in the kitchen, and is paired with a large timber island bench designed to resemble an oversized chopping board. Photo – Derek Swalwell. Styling – Studio Stamp

Artwork by Milo Lockett. Photo – Derek Swalwell. Styling – Studio Stamp

The concealed home bar! Photo – Derek Swalwell. Styling – Studio Stamp

The deep blue in sitting room references the home’s original stained glass windows. Photo – Derek Swalwell. Styling – Studio Stamp

OMG Light by Volker Haug in the luxurious new sitting room. Photo – Derek Swalwell. Styling – Studio Stamp

Artwork ‘Nick Cave’ by Howard Arkley. Photo – Derek Swalwell. Styling – Studio Stamp

Framed handpainted portrait Alexandra Brownlow Artist. by Photo – Derek Swalwell. Styling – Studio Stamp

Artworks on left by Nanyuma Napangati from Papunya Tula Artists Pty Ltd. Artworks on right: ‘Water Dreaming’ by Sally Clark. Photo – Derek Swalwell. Styling – Studio Stamp

A subtle crank in the facade follows the angle of the park opposite, while a large picture window provides optimum view. Photo – Derek Swalwell. Styling – Studio Stamp

After numerous renovations over its long history, this 1890s St Kilda West was finally ready for a major transformation. 

Sophie Gunnersen of Studio Stamp (who collaborated on the interior design and styling) and Mills & York engaged Lucy Clemenger Architects to renovate the family home, giving them an equally practical and aspirational brief. 

Lucy Clemenger Architects redeveloped the home to take better advantage of its park-side adjacent location. The house opens directly onto a rear lane and green space, expanding the perceived boundaries of the site, and providing valuable added outdoor space. 

The clients were also specific about their love for year-round entertaining. A new open-plan kitchen, living and dining space was designed to accommodate, extending on to extending onto an outdoor deck and plunge green. Expansive floor-to-ceiling glazing and integrated sliding doors provide views across to the park, creating a further sense of spaciousness and serenity. 

Remaining rooms were converted into a main bedroom suite and a luxurious sitting room. Saturated colours reference the home’s original stained glass windows and provide a backdrop to the client’s stunning collection of art, furniture, and custom lighting. 

Key viewing points from the laneway and adjacent park informed the scale, form and articulation of the new upper rear facade, resulting in a three-dimension volume seemingly floating above a glazed wall. A subtle crank in the facade follows the angle of the park opposite, while a large picture window provides optimum views. Timber cladding provides shading to the interiors and prevents overlooking to and from neighbouring properties. 

The use of timber alongside terracotta tiles, deep sea green tiles, and Carrara marble references the home’s bayside locale, reconciling it with the robust fabric of the heritage house.  

Lucy Clemenger Architects’ alterations have completely transformed this house, creating a space that’s both connected with its immediate surroundings, and serves as a sanctuary.