From Unliveable To Unbelievable!

From Unliveable To Unbelievable!

From Unliveable To Unbelievable!

Architecture

by Amelia Barnes

Flos ‘String’ pendant light from Euroluce. Mark Tuckey ‘Tripod’ dining table. Cassina ‘412 Cab’ chairs from Cult. Photo – Eve Wilson. Styling – Larritt-Evans

 Gebrüder Thonet Vienna GmbH ‘Curve’ barstools from Space. Photo – Eve Wilson. Styling – Larritt-Evans

Cassina ‘412 Cab’ chairs from Cult. Photo – Eve Wilson. Styling – Larritt-Evans

B&B Italia Tufty-Time Sofa from Space. B&B Italian ‘Le Bambole 07’ sofa from Space. ‘Oxo’ coffee table from Mark Tuckey. Moroccan rug by Beni Ouarain from Loom. Photo – Eve Wilson. Styling – Larritt-Evans

Right: B&B Italia Tufty-Time Sofa from Space. B&B Italian ‘Le Bambole 07’ sofa from Space. ‘Oxo’ coffee table from Mark Tuckey. Moroccan rug by Beni Ouarain from Loom. Photo – Eve Wilson. Styling – Larritt-Evans.

Vibia ‘Wireflow 0300’ pendant from Koda over the stairs. Photo – Eve Wilson. Styling –  Larritt-Evans

‘Cloud’ armchair and sofa from Great Dane. Jane Cohen artwork. Christopher Boots ‘Portal’ table lamp. Douglas and Bec ‘Line 06 2.0’ pendant and ‘Line’ wall sconce. Armadillo & Co custom rug. Photo – Eve Wilson. Styling – Claire Larritt-Evans

Lavamani wash basins from Rogerseller. Photo – Eve Wilson. Styling – Claire Larritt-Evans

Arik Levy pendant. Photo – Eve Wilson. Styling – Claire Larritt-Evans

Circular motifs are referenced throughout. Photo – Eve Wilson. Styling – Claire Larritt-Evans

A cohesive use of black oxide steel visually link the home’s interiors, outdoor pergola and pool house. Photo – Eve Wilson. Styling – Claire Larritt-Evans

The rear extension meanwhile adopts a roof form and double-height scale inspired by the ‘forest of chimneys’ in the existing building, and houses the living room, kitchen, outdoor pergola. Photo – Eve Wilson. Styling – Claire Larritt-Evans

The raised pool in basalt allows movement of water down the waterfall edge. Photo – Eve Wilson. Styling – Claire Larritt-Evans

This grand Edwardian home in Melbourne’s Elsternwick was at risk of ruin, until new owners purchased the property in 2013, and engaged BayleyWard to bring it back to life.

The clients requested a large family oasis with a circular flow of spaces both vertically and horizontally, but major creative decisions were left to BayleyWard. 

Working closely with multiple collaborators, the architects set about restoring the original heritage home and adding a contemporary extension. 

The first port of call – removing layers of paint, water damage and lean-to additions to reveal salvageable period features in the original Edwardian rooms. These rooms now contain the home’s ‘grown-up spaces’, including the study and main bedroom.

The rear extension meanwhile houses the living room, kitchen, and outdoor pergola, adopting a roof form and double-height scale inspired by the ‘forest of chimneys’ in the existing building.

A new cantilevered staircase leads to the attic turned mezzanine, which frames backyard views as you move upwards. (The home’s original stairs have also been retained, leading directly into a separate upper floor den.)

A cohesive use of black oxide steel visually link the home’s interiors, outdoor pergola and pool house together, but the material palette is otherwise varied. For example, in the kitchen, a polished concrete floor rises to form the island bench, while grain timber blocks help define the dining area. ‘In the bedrooms and study, the materiality was softer, and the wall colours could do more of the work,’ says Nick. ‘Our interiors team are not afraid of colour and layering, which I think gives each build an authenticity.’ 

Circular motifs in the original brickwork are also referenced in the extension to further link these spaces together, as seen in the light fittings, joinery door detail and select furniture pieces.

Nick describes the finished product as a ‘celebration of the fusion of heritage and contemporary architecture, on this great Elsternwick street.’