Watch Doug Aitken's mirrored Mirage Gstaad pavilion change with the seasons

Mirage Gstaad, a mirrored building created by American artist Doug Aitken, reflects the shifting landscape of the Alps in this exclusive video for Dezeen.

The reflective pavilion, which has previously been installed in the desert near Palm Springs, currently sits in an Alpine meadow above Gstaad, Switzerland.

Mirage Gstaad mirrored building art installation by Doug Aitken in Switzerland in spring
Seasons changing are reflected in Mirage Gstaad

As people happen upon Mirage Gstaad they can approach it and even walk inside, where the mirrored walls frame windows and skylights.

“I saw Mirage as a human-scale lens that the viewer would enter into, and in the process, they would become the work,” said Aitken.

Mirage Gstaad mirrored building art installation by Doug Aitken in Switzerland in summer
The mirrored walls produce a kaleidoscope effect

As the seasons change around it, the mirrors that cover Mirage House create a shifting display of scenery and sky.

“I am very interested in artworks that change continuously,” continued the artist. “Artworks that change with the landscape.”

Mirage Gstaad mirrored building art installation by Doug Aitken in Switzerland in winter
Weather
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Fans are transforming this popular bargain mirror with paint – the results are incredible

The Range Arch mirror is a favourite among shoppers for making a statement in their homes. However, fans are upgrading the old favourite with a clever DIY hack.

Related: It’s back! The Range chair that caused a shopping frenzy last year is now available in navy

Posting on Instagram The Range shared an image of their Ivory Arch Mirror, transformed with a tin of black spray paint. ‘DIY TREND! We’re seeing a few of you transform our Ivory Arch Mirror by painting it black and WOW what a difference!’ reads the caption.

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Australia’s “eye popping” budget deficit and public debt blow out – can it be paid off? Does it matter?

The Australian Federal budget next month will likely see a further blow out in the budget deficit due to the ongoing hit to tax revenue and need for more stimulus.

But is that really going to be a big problem?

In the recent Oliver’s Insight Dr Shane Oliver, Head of Investment Strategy and Economics and Chief Economist at AMP explained why we likely have to get used to a long period of high public debt and it may not be as big a concern as some think.

Here is what he said….

From “eye watering” to “eye popping”

Much concern has been expressed about the longer-term consequences of the blowout in budget deficits and public debt in response to the economic hit from coronavirus.

This is understandable given their scale. In Australia, the Treasurer described the projected budget deficit for this financial year of $185bn as “eye watering”.

That’s more … Read more

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A Quaint Miner’s Cottage In Dubbo Made For Slowing Down

A Quaint Miner’s Cottage In Dubbo Made For Slowing Down

Stays

Sasha Gattermayr

The kitchen at The Repose has been fully updated to service contemporary amenities. Photo – Abbie Melle.

It has everything you need for the perfect, relaxing getaway. Photo – Abbie Melle.

A moody colour palette in the kitchen differs from the lightness of the rest of the house. Photo – Abbie Melle.

Original Thonet Le Corbusier chairs in the dining room. Photo – Abbie Melle.

A custom made brass lamp sourced from Wo+We in France. Photo – Abbie Melle.

A home bar in the living room also holds a painting by Kyah Wilson.  Photo – Abbie Melle.

A custom made brass lamp sourced from Wo+We in France in the lounge room sits beside an artwork by Adam Oste. Photo – Abbie Melle.

The renovated courtyard is the common favourite spot

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The Tyre Collective develops car-mounted device to capture microplastic emissions from tyres

A patent-pending technology designed by British startup The Tyre Collective to capture the unseen synthetic rubber particles expelled by car tyres has been awarded this year’s UK national James Dyson Award.

Developed by a group of graduate students from Imperial College and the Royal College of Art, the prototype can be suspended from each wheel’s steering knuckle, just above where the tyre meets the road, to capture the microplastic fragments released through friction every time the car breaks, accelerates or turns a corner.

The Tyre Collective's TC01 device has won the national James Dyson Award 2020
The Tyre Collective’s prototype can be fitted to the steering knuckle of a car

These microscopic pieces of artificial rubber, called tyre wear, account for more than half of all particulate emissions created by vehicles on the road and are released into the air and waterways.

“We began the project looking at microplastics at large and were shocked when we discovered that tyre wear was … Read more

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